attentive book reports

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Attentive book reports pay to do education thesis statement

Attentive book reports

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Attentive book reports. Share this post:. No email…. Not everyone loves book reports as much as I do, so I created this list of book report alternatives to help homeschooling moms and classroom teachers alike come up with their own ideas for alternatives to the written book report. If you have other ideas please share them with me in the comments! Choose a character from the book and create sentences for each letter of the alphabet.

Write an alternate ending — one that makes sense for the story line, but did not take place. Make a crossword puzzle or word search using character names, events, and other words from the book. Marina Medovoy, 25, Clay, New York. This was the first time i asked for help from you guys. Its amazing how you handled my order and ensured that I received my paper with the right specifications! You are an amazing team! Book reports have been a staple in American English classes for decades.

Students use them to prove their ability to think critically, read deeply, and express their ideas in an eloquent manner. Sign in Request a Demo. Text Talk. SMS Strategies. Trends and Insights. Product News. Direct to Consumer. Customer Stories. Company News. List Growth. SMS Customer Service.

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Explore our trusted ecosystem of best-in-class technology platforms and agencies. Audience Manager. Business Intelligence. Sign in Request a Demo. Text Talk. SMS Strategies. Trends and Insights. Product News. Direct to Consumer. Customer Stories. Company News. List Growth. SMS Customer Service. If you have other ideas please share them with me in the comments!

Choose a character from the book and create sentences for each letter of the alphabet. Write an alternate ending — one that makes sense for the story line, but did not take place. Make a crossword puzzle or word search using character names, events, and other words from the book. Marina Medovoy, 25, Clay, New York. This was the first time i asked for help from you guys.

Its amazing how you handled my order and ensured that I received my paper with the right specifications! You are an amazing team! Book reports have been a staple in American English classes for decades. Students use them to prove their ability to think critically, read deeply, and express their ideas in an eloquent manner. Instead, English teachers need to approach book reports in a way that will engage and teach students just as much as the material the report is on. Bring your traditional book report assignments into the 21st century, and make the format as much of a teaching moment as the content with these four ideas.

A pair of students created an audio file of them reviewing a book that each had read separately , based off of a pre-written list of bullet points and some notes to help jog their memory. Meanwhile, the bullet points helped them stay on track and addressed everything that their rubric required. These types of book reports are easy to make with any audio recording software, such as GarageBand or the Sound Recorder by Windows. Julie Polanco, 23, Washington Four, Maryland. I give all my prompts to you as you really managed to fulfill all my intentions and desires.

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Create a word collage using words from the book, character names, and even the title of your story. Plan a dream vacation for your favorite character from the book. Where would they go? Write an itinerary for the days they'll be on vacation. Draw a picture of what you think your favorite character's bedroom looks like. Do the same for your least favorite character.

Create a life-sized model of your favorite character from the book. Use real fabric to create cut-out clothes for them. Do a science experiment based on a character from the book. What did the character like to learn about? Make the experiment interesting to them. Make a banner out of cloth or a long roll of paper telling about your favorite parts from the book.

Nominate one of the characters for President. Design a model town like the one from the book. If they don't talk about the town, design the house or other setting. Put on a puppet show! Create puppets even if they're out of brown bags of the characters from the book, and write and act out a play with them. Design costumes that your book's characters would have worn.

You can do this on paper or with fabric! Do a brown bag book report and collect items that tell about the book. For example, an apple or a drawing or cut-out of one for Snow White. Make a mobile using a hanger or popsicle sticks, and magazine cut-outs or your own drawings, giving details about the book.

Bookcast a review of the book you just read, being as creative as possible for your audience. Write an online review of the book, using a site like wetpaint. You can read reviews from other students, and share your book reviews as well. If you have a classroom or homeschool group, you can create a classroom book review wiki as well.

Then, all of the students can add their own book reviews. Create a movie poster advertising the book. You can create one online using a website like glogster. Be sure to include the title, author, key characters, etc. Design a comic version of the book, using a program like PicMonkey online — or by using pen cil and paper. Use bookwink. Watch other videos to find new books to read! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Close Top Banner. Related Posts.

Here's a list of over 60 Mother Daughter Date Ideas! Whether you want to have…. This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my Disclaimer and Privacy policy for more information. Book Report Alternatives 1. Write a poem that explains the book and what you loved about it. Create a diary as if you were one of the characters from the story. Make a time line of the events in your book. Draw pictures for major events. Design a quiz for the book you read, and an answer sheet as well.

Prepare a travel brochure to convince tourists to visit your character's home town. Write a news article about an event from the book. Keep a list of new words you learned by reading your book. Use them each in a sentence. Write an acrostic poem about the book using the letters in the title of the book.

Create a job listing for a character in the book. Then, create a resume for that character. Compare and contrast two characters from the book. Do some research on the area your book took place. Write 10 quick facts about it. Create a dictionary using difficult words and their definitions from the book. After reading a book, each student shares reactions to the book in a letter written to its author. If a student writes to an author who is still alive, you might actually mail the letter.

Sell It. Each student pretends to be a publicist for the book that's just been read. The student writes and then delivers a second speech that will persuade other students that they should read the book. Writing and speaking persuasively will be especially difficult if the student didn't like the book. If that's the case, the student can share that fact after completing the speech. Create a Card Catalog. After reading a book, a student completes an index card with information about the book.

The front of the card includes details such as title, author, and date published along with a two- to three-sentence synopsis of the book. On the back of the card, the student writes a paragraph critiquing the book. Students might even rate the book using a teacher-created five-star rating system. Example: A five-star book is "highly recommended; a book you can't put down. Interview a Character.

Each student composes six to eight questions to ask a main character in a book just completed. The student also writes the character's response to each question. The questions and answers should provide information that shows the student read the book without giving away the most significant details. Ten Facts. Each student creates a "Ten Facts About [book title]" sheet that lists ten facts he or she learned from reading the book.

The facts, written in complete sentences, must include details the student didn't know before reading the book. Script It! Each student writes a movie script for a favorite scene in a book just read. At the top of the script, the student can assign real-life TV or movie stars to play each role.

The student might also work with classmates to perform the favorite scene. Each student will need 30 index cards to create a Concentration-style game related to a book just finished. The student chooses 14 things, characters, or events that played a part in the book and creates two cards that have identical pictures of each of those things.

The two remaining cards are marked Wild Card! Then the student turns all 30 cards facedown and mixes them up. Each student can choose a partner with whom to play according to the rules of Concentration. What Did You Learn? Each student writes a summary of what he or she learned from a book just completed.

The summary might include factual information, something learned about people in general, or something the student learned about himself or herself. Glossary and Word Search. Each student creates a glossary of ten or more words that are specific to a book's tone, setting, or characters. The student defines each word and writes a sentence from the book that includes that word.

Then the student creates a word search puzzle that includes the glossary words. Students can exchange their glossaries and word searches with others in the class. In the News. Each student creates the front page of a newspaper that tells about events and characters in a book just read.

The newspaper page might include weather reports, an editorial or editorial cartoon, ads, etc. The title of the newspaper should be something appropriate to the book. Create a Comic Book. Each student can turn a book, or part of it, into a comic book, complete with comic-style illustrations and dialogue bubbles.

Characters Come to Life. Each student creates life-size "portraits" of one of the characters from a book just read. The portrait should include a written piece that tells about the character. The piece might also include information about events, traits, or conflicts in the book that involve that character.

Hang the students' portraits in a class gallery. Prove It in Five Minutes. Each student gives a second 2-minute oral presentation in which he or she shares information about a book's plot and characters. The student closes the presentation by offering an opinion and recommendation about the book. Then students in the audience have seconds to question the presenter about the book.

If the presenter is able to prove in five minutes that he or she read the book, the student is excused from filing a written report about it. Picture Books. After reading a book, each student creates a picture book version of the story that would appeal to younger students. The students can then share the picture books with a group of young students. Resume Writing. As a tie-in to your career education program, challenge each student to create a resume for a book character. The student should include in the resume a statement of the applicant's goals and a detailed account of his or her experience and outside interests.

Character Trait Chart. Each student creates a chart with three columns. Each column is headed with the name of one of the book's characters. As the student reads the book, he or she can keep a record of the traits each character possesses and include an incident that supports each trait. Theme Report. Challenge each student to select a concept or a thing from the book just finished and to use library or Internet resources to explore it further.

The student then writes a two-page report that shares information about the topic. To learn more about the setting of a book, each student writes a one-page report explaining how that setting was important to the story. The entries should share details about the story that will prove the student read the book. You can find curated collections of high-interest fiction and non-fiction texts at Steps to Literacy. Steps to Literacy offers inclusive and differentiated collections of age and developmentally appropriate books and resources that engage students and foster a love for reading within each of them.

Learn more about building your own customized classroom library. Leave this field blank. Search Search. Newsletter Sign Up. Search form Search. Make A Book Report Sandwich! Her idea: book report sandwiches! On the top slice of bread, each student wrote the title and the author of the book the student had just finished reading. On the lettuce, the student wrote a brief summary of the book.

The student wrote about the main character on the tomato slice. On the mayonnaise, the student described the book's setting. The student shared the book's climax on the Swiss cheese. On the ham slice, the student described the plot. On the bottom piece of bread, the student drew a favorite scene from the story. They were instructed to include the following: Questions Write ten questions based on the book.

Five of the questions can be about general content, but the other five must require more thinking. Vocabulary Create a ten-word glossary of unfamiliar words from the book. Things Include five things that have a connection to the story. The ideas appeal to many different learning styles. Many of the ideas involve making choices, organizing information -- and writing!

Most of the ideas will provide teachers with a clear idea about whether students actually read the book. And all the ideas will engage students, help make books come alive for them, and challenge them to think in different ways about the books they read!

Trending Report Card Comments It's report card time and you face the prospect of writing constructive, insightful, and original comments on a couple dozen report cards or more. Here are positive report card comments for you to use and adapt! Struggling Students? You've reached the end of another grading period, and what could be more daunting than the task of composing insightful, original, and unique comments about every child in your class?

The following positive statements will help you tailor your comments to specific children and highlight their strengths. You can also use our statements to indicate a need for improvement. Turn the words around a bit, and you will transform each into a goal for a child to work toward. Sam cooperates consistently with others becomes Sam needs to cooperate more consistently with others, and Sally uses vivid language in writing may instead read With practice, Sally will learn to use vivid language in her writing.

Make Jan seeks new challenges into a request for parental support by changing it to read Please encourage Jan to seek new challenges. Whether you are tweaking statements from this page or creating original ones, check out our Report Card Thesaurus [see bottom of the page] that contains a list of appropriate adjectives and adverbs. There you will find the right words to keep your comments fresh and accurate. We have organized our report card comments by category. Read the entire list or click one of the category links below to jump to that list.

Behavior The student: cooperates consistently with the teacher and other students. Character The student: shows respect for teachers and peers. Group Work The student: offers constructive suggestions to peers to enhance their work. Interests and Talents The student: has a well-developed sense of humor. Participation The student: listens attentively to the responses of others. Social Skills The student: makes friends quickly in the classroom. Time Management The student: tackles classroom assignments, tasks, and group work in an organized manner.

Work Habits The student: is a conscientious, hard-working student. Student Certificates! Recognize positive attitudes and achievements with personalized student award certificates! Report Card Thesaurus Looking for some great adverbs and adjectives to bring to life the comments that you put on report cards?

Go beyond the stale and repetitive With this list, your notes will always be creative and unique. Adjectives attentive, capable, careful, cheerful, confident, cooperative, courteous, creative, dynamic, eager, energetic, generous, hard-working, helpful, honest, imaginative, independent, industrious, motivated, organized, outgoing, pleasant, polite, resourceful, sincere, unique Adverbs always, commonly, consistently, daily, frequently, monthly, never, occasionally, often, rarely, regularly, typically, usually, weekly.

Included: A stadium full of activities and links to team sites, baseball math sites, cross-curricular projects -- and even the famous Abbott and Costello "Who's On First? For students, the welcome warmth of the spring sun, the tantalizing sight of green grass and manicured base lines, the far off sound of a bat meeting a ball, the imagined scent of popcorn and hotdogs, can be powerful distracters. Desperate measures are called for!

Bring the game into the classroom -- and score a home run -- with this week's Education World lessons and activities. Although most are designed for students in grades 5 and above, many can be adapted for younger students as well.