book report on crossroads of twilight

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Book report on crossroads of twilight professional thesis writers services

Book report on crossroads of twilight

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Upon its release, it immediately rose to the 1 position on the New York Times best seller list for hardcover fiction, making it the third Wheel of Time book to reach the 1 position on that list. It remained on the list for the next three months.

Crossroads of Twilight consists of a prologue , 30 chapters , and an epilogue. Many of the events of Crossroads of Twilight take place simultaneously with the events of the previous book, Winter's Heart. Perrin Aybara continues trying to rescue his wife Faile Bashere , kidnapped by the Shaido Aiel , even torturing prisoners for information. In addition, Perrin is approached with the suggestion of alliance with the Seanchan to defeat the Shaido.

Mat Cauthon continues trying to escape Seanchan territory while courting Tuon , the heir to the Seanchan leadership. In the process, Mat discovers that Tuon is a sul'dam and can be taught to channel the One Power. Elayne Trakand continues trying to solidify her hold on the Lion Throne of Andor.

It is revealed that she is expecting twins; but the identity of the father Rand is kept secret from others. They return at the end of the book to tell him that the Seanchan have accepted the truce, but demand the presence of the Dragon Reborn to meet with the Daughter of the Nine Moons. Egwene leads the siege of Tar Valon ; but is kidnapped by agents of the White Tower after successfully blocking its River Port.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Dewey Decimal. The Wheel of Time. New Spring 1. The Eye of the World 2. The Great Hunt 3. The Dragon Reborn 4. Fleeing from Ebou Dar with the kidnapped Daughter of the Nine Moons, whom he is fated to marry, Mat Cauthon learns that he can neither keep her In the tenth book of The Wheel of Time from the New York Times 1 bestselling author Robert Jordan, the world and the characters stand at a crossroads, and the world approaches twilight, when the power of the Shadow grows stronger.

Fleeing from Ebou Dar with the kidnapped Daughter of the Nine Moons, whom he is fated to marry, Mat Cauthon learns that he can neither keep her nor let her go, not in safety for either of them, for both the Shadow and the might of the Seanchan Empire are in deadly pursuit.

Perrin Aybara seeks to free his wife, Faile, a captive of the Shaido, but his only hope may be an alliance with the enemy. Can he remain true to his friend Rand and to himself? For his love of Faile, Perrin is willing to sell his soul. At Tar Valon, Egwene al'Vere, the young Amyrlin of the rebel Aes Sedai, lays siege to the heart of Aes Sedai power, but she must win quickly, with as little bloodshed as possible, for unless the Aes Sedai are reunited, only the male Asha'man will remain to defend the world against the Dark One, and nothing can hold the Asha'man themselves back from total power except the Aes Sedai and a unified White Tower.

In Andor, Elayne Trakland fights for the Lion Throne that is hers by right, but enemies and Darkfriends surround her, plotting her destruction. If she fails, Andor may fall to the Shadow, and the Dragon Reborn with it. Rand al'Thor, the Dragon Reborn himself, has cleansed the Dark One's taint from the male half of the True Source, and everything has changed. Yet nothing has, for only men who can channel believe that saidin is clean again, and a man who can channel is still hated and feared-even one prophesied to save the world.

Now, Rand must gamble again, with himself at stake, and he cannot be sure which of his allies are really enemies. Get A Copy. Hardcover , First Edition , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Crossroads of Twilight , please sign up. Somebody gave this book to me - do I have to read the first 9 books in the series to understand what's going on?

Richard It is best to read the first nine books and skip this one entirely. Does the book- series have simple languange-vocabulary? I'm planning on reading it in english although it's not my native language. M No, its a more complex vocabulary. I'd recommend reading the kindle version so that you can highlight words and get a quick definition.

See 2 questions about Crossroads of Twilight…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Sep 22, Zach rated it it was ok. At least it was intentional on Jordan's part. My award for least rewarding plot line definitely goes to Perrin. He's off dealing with the prophet of the dragon while hunting for the Shaido, who have kidnapped Faile. Incidentally, those three are in a dead heat for which side character I care about the least.

Not that he ever attempts a rescue or anything resembling action, but he does smell a lot of emotions, examine the orderliness of his army camp, and spend three chapters going shopping for barley. View all 58 comments. I love being in the minority! Happy Reading! View all 13 comments. Hope this slog fest is over and things will move forward more swiftly from this point on.

View all 12 comments. Let me save you some time. Whines about Queen stuff. Aviendha is also there. Some are not. Also they argue a lot. And the dice roll. Saved you 7 hours. View all 14 comments. Mar 31, Kat Hooper rated it did not like it. Crossroads of Twilight was maddening.

I read it years ago and ended up giving up on The Wheel of Time after this book. I tried again in my preparation for reading Memory of Light, and I just couldn't manage to do it again. I skimmed the chapters involving Perrin's hunt for Faile because I remembered how slow, grueling, and painful they were when I read them the first time. I also skimmed a lot of Elayne's campaigning and dealing with the constantly whining Sea Folk because not much happened here, either.

There were only two chapters out of 30 from Rand's point of view. Mat was entertaining, but he didn't get anywhere either. In Crossroads of Twilight, expect more politicking, planning, negotiating, committee discussions, bathing, dressing, shopping, and description of tapestries and seating arrangements than action.

There were very few significant occurrences -- mostly the characters just talked to themselves and others. Only one major event happened, and that occurred in the last 3 minutes on audio. Here is a sample of some of the pulse-pounding action you'll encounter in Crossroads of Twilight: "'I see,' Egwene said slowly. She realized she was massaging the side of her head. The throb behind her eyes beat on. It would grow stronger. It always did. By nightfall, she was going to regret having sent Halima away.

Bringing her hand down firmly, she moved the leather folder in front of her a half inch to the left, then slid it back. But at least we didn't have to hear about Nynaeve's braid There are characters in The Wheel of Time and it's impossible for anyone who's not writing a dissertation on the series to keep them all straight.

It doesn't help that so many of the names are similar, either. At this point, many of them are all just a big jumble and you have to use a resource like Encyclopaedia WOT who have all characters listed, described, and tracked to even begin to understand all of the politicking. It also doesn't help that Jordan made occasional mistakes along the way nicely pointed out by Encyclopaedia WOT.

If it weren't for Brandon Sanderson's finale, I would absolutely give up at this point I did once. By the way, let me say here and now March , for the record, that I don't believe Mr. Sanderson will be able to clean up this mess with only one volume.

Read more Robert Jordan book reviews at Fantasy literature. View all 18 comments. This is book 10 of the series and is probably the one with the least action and most politicking of them all. As such, I am not surprised that it is the lowest rated of all the series, since it seems the majority of us are so addicted to the immediate gratification so prevalent in our society today, that anything which demands our brains to concentrate and actually work to figure things out instead of being spoon-fed to us, we find boring and tedious..

Well, there isn't any action in this book. No fights, no battles, no big revelations. It seems like every page is full of POV's of secondary or tertiary characters who on the surface make no difference to the overall story plot. And yet, it is like mountain being built one small pebble at a time. I have said it before and I will say it again - Robert Jordan is a genius of storytelling, a man so in control of the tale he is crafting, that the least of the paragraphs are filled with some information that makes the foundation for something totally visually unrelated, but at the end it all makes sense.

Not only sense, but the world becomes so real to us because of all those invisible details, that we surprise ourselves as to how well we are familiar and grounded in it. At times, as we get closer to the last book, the world of WoT seems more richly layered and real than the one we inhabit in our daily lives. So yes, despite the lack of shiny action and developments, this book is still a wonderful addition to the series. The characters, the banter, even the completely idiotic mistakes some of our gang make at this point of the story, all the plotting, betrayals, double-crossing and new connections on all the newly forming fronts, all of them continue weaving one of the greatest sagas of all times!!!!

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills and may we all find our place in the tapestry of Life!!! Happy Reading View all 26 comments. Feb 15, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it really liked it Shelves: epic , united-states , fantasy , science , young-adult , literature , fiction , adventure , magic , 21th-century.

Perrin Aybara continues trying to rescue his wife Faile Bashere, kidnapped by the Shaido Aiel, even torturing prisoners for information. In addition, Perrin is approached with the suggestion of alliance with the Seanchan to defeat the Shaido. Mat Cauthon continues trying to escape Seanchan territory while courting Tuon, the heir to the Seanchan leadership. In the process, Mat discovers that Tuon is a sul'dam and can be taught to channel the One Power.

Elayne Trakand continues trying to solidify her hold on the Lion Throne of Andor. It is revealed that she is expecting twins; but the identity of the father Rand is kept secret from others. They return at the end of the book to tell him that the Seanchan have accepted the truce, but demand the presence of the Dragon Reborn to meet with the Daughter of the Nine Moons. Egwene leads the siege of Tar Valon; but is kidnapped by agents of the White Tower after successfully blocking its River Port.

We rode on the winds of the rising storm, We ran to the sounds of the thunder. We danced among the lightning bolts, and tore the world asunder. Is it still amazing? Pfft, it's a Wheel of Time book. Of course it is. In terms of plot development, this book has nothing to offer. Absolutely nothing. But the world and the characters are so fantastic I don't even mind. And since for the first time, none of the protagonists We rode on the winds of the rising storm, We ran to the sounds of the thunder.

And since for the first time, none of the protagonists act like whiny teenagers, I want to read the next one straight away. View all 19 comments. Nov 02, Robin Bridge Four rated it it was ok. The Rundown: Faile is still kidnapped by the Shido and Perrin is pretty much at the end of his tether trying to get her back. Everyone still thinks that Perrin has a thing with that bitch Beralain view spoiler [This is not resolved in this book they are still apart plus enter Rolan who likes Faile and I see even more angst and people thinking others cheated in the future for them.

She is still having headaches and she has no idea where they are coming from. Rand is still missing all of the Maidens. No seriously what happened to them? Mat Cauthon still has those bloody dice rolling in his head Actually this was the one arc that was at all interesting to me. Loial is finally back. But he only gets a few token mentions and parts in this book.

Maybe in the next he will get a bigger role. But at least some of the Seanchan PoVs were really enlightening and gave some added depth to their culture. I want certain characters to meet so we can just resolve a few things. There are just too many loose threads everywhere. It is time to start resolving a few things. In all of the last books there is a climax at the end. Jun 16, Alex Nieves rated it did not like it. View all 8 comments. Apr 16, Gavin rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy.

This was definitely the slowest WoT book in the series. Not a lot happened in the story arcs of the vast majority of the main characters. As a result this was probably the least enjoyable of the WoT books so far. Not to say it was bad! Jordan is an excellent storyteller and I enjoyed the vast majority of the stuff we did get.

What did happen to our favourite characters? Spoilers ahead!!! Rand: After the dramatic events of the last book he made only a fleeting appearance in this one and did little This was definitely the slowest WoT book in the series. Rand: After the dramatic events of the last book he made only a fleeting appearance in this one and did little more than tread water.

Mat: The star of this book. He might not have done much but his chapters were pure fun as he started his hilarious courtship of the Daughter of the Nine Moons. Perrin: Just like Mat his chapters were engaging despite the fact that he did absolutely nothing.

He is still searching for Faile! Towards the end we also had to suffer an incident that really damaged my opinion of him as a character. Elayne: I usually love the female WoT characters as much as the male ones but their is no denying that Elayne's chapters in this one were a bit slow and dull. Egwene: Just like Elayne her chapters were a bit dull. She was doing more of the same right up until the end were she suffered a bout of the extreme idiocy that our WoT faves catch from time to time.

Aviendha, Min, Faile, and Tuon: The love interests mostly just hung around batting their eyes at the menfolk or pining for them. Faile was probably the pick of the bunch as she took time from her pining to try and set an escape plan into motion. Probably a good idea considering Perrin has not been much help in that regard for the last few books! Random Secondary Characters: We got a bunch of them.

Most were interesting and such POV segments always add an extra level of depth to the world. The downside is that none of the always interesting Forsaken made much of an appearance. All in all I did enjoy this one despite the fact that it had a few slow spots and almost no real advancement in any of the ongoing story arcs.

Rating: 4 stars. I was tempted to go with 3. Audio Note: I praise Krammer and Reading every book and that is because they deserve it. They really are fantastic narrators. It is a massive plus for the WoT series that the pair narrate every single book in the series. The production company should get some credit for seeing that we "readers" got to enjoy such consistent and excellent performance. View all 11 comments. Apr 22, Books with Brittany rated it it was ok. View all 5 comments.

May 05, Brimm rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Not even Hitler should be subjected to reading this. Shelves: fantasy. I will keep this short. In this book, absolutely nothing happens. There is no character development. There is no plot. My advice to those slogging through this series: Read the last ten pages of this book, and then continue on to Knife of Dreams, a flawed book I will keep this short.

My advice to those slogging through this series: Read the last ten pages of this book, and then continue on to Knife of Dreams, a flawed book, but at least one where something happens. Then, if you're a truly charitable individual, go to your local bookshop, buy all the copies, and get rid of them so that nobody will have to be subjected to this crap.

View 2 comments. Mar 28, Mayim de Vries rated it it was ok. Kind of, but not really. My modest estimate bets on about 25 volumes , where volumes would be devoted mainly to describing the menus, drinking habits among the Ogier, and contained mostly descriptions of dreams. In general, after the bang finalising the previous book, here we are only dealing with boring and quite meaningless consequences of what had already happened.

The worst thing is that nearly all the protagonists begin to suffer from something I hate: a mental eclipse. As a result, they cease to notice the obvious and behave idiotically. Perrin wanders about either brooding or growling and feeling sorry for himself. Sincerely, Team Berelain. Aviendha is sitting with her in this palace, no one knows what for and why; what a waste of a potentially great female figure! Rand rests rests! In fact, when it comes to the fallout, he could have achieved nothing.

The Forsaken have all but vanished, I guess they are devastated by how poorly they were used by the author. Egwene finally shows up in Tar Valon, but what is the aim, I cannot begin to wonder as she absolutely refuses to let her general to engage. Against the previous haste, instead of winning a war she is waiting and thinking. And with her all the Aes Sedai sit and wait in some sort of stupor that belies everything we have been told about these women since volume one.

In general the White Tower is busy with drinking tea, mobbing each other and fighting the staring duels. Amyrlin is the only one not suspicious about a person she personally likes chatting with. What is that? Someone in the camp is on a killing spree? Who cares. Nothing to worry about. And so on to the very last page, which turned out to be the climax of stupidity of one of the protagonists.

Honestly, the ending made me laugh. Maybe someone will finally cut her ego down to size. In the meantime, performing their important tasks, such as undressing and dressing after taking a bath, all of which is described in every painful detail. Sub-plots of quaternary characters also take up a lot of space , despite not adding anything to the tale. There are also new protagonists, and why not.

At least it counter-balances the fact that interesting moments can be counted on the fingers of one hand. Nothing has moved forward. All those hidden schemes inside plots wrapped in stratagems result in big fat non-action.

Mat and Tuon escaping from Ebou Dar is the only thing that brings something to the story - again. It is amazing how Robert Jordan has gone astray when writing this book… Yes, I am reading the next one, already.

Thankfully, the end of the tunnel is only 4 books ahead. Also in the series: 1. View all 6 comments. Despite the entanglement of way too many characters, some with similarly confusing names, and also despite the too elaborate descriptions I'm not a particular fan of too detailed descriptions, and how many times can I read a very thorough depiction of a kitchen and everything in it, or of a stable, or an inn interior, or the petticoats and dress colors and cut , I still very much liked the book and the development of the events.

Jul 31, Evgeny rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. I really need to mention the reason for my rating of the book; it is a strange one. The only reason I gave this book 3 stars and not 2 which it deserves more is that I never reread the books I rate with 2 stars while I just finished rereading this one. I mentioned 2 star rating as a big series fan.

Absolutely nothing, that is what. Another big part of the frustration comes from the fact that the previous book ended with a grand event which would surely cha I really need to mention the reason for my rating of the book; it is a strange one. Another big part of the frustration comes from the fact that the previous book ended with a grand event which would surely change the history of the whole world and already changed the power picture among the major players, including the remaining Forsaken.

Speaking of whom, I would love to see a POV from any of these just to know how the said event affected them, but it was the first book in a long time which did not have a POV of any of the Forsaken. What remain are mostly 4 subplots which dragged on and on. Mat was the first guy with such subplot. His POV was mildly amusing, but nothing of note happened with him or people around him. He is stuck in a traveling circus and tries to balance his ragtag team with practically everybody doing the things their own way.

Perrin's POV is the most dreadfully boring one. He broods non-stop and does not do much except this. I did not suspect in the beginning of the series this guy would need Faile as a wet nurse every single moment and would fall completely apart without her.

If I ever get around reading this book again, this is the part I will skip. Elayne still tries to keep the throne while keeping even her more colorful group under some resemblance of control: Aes Sedai, the Wise Ones, the Kin, and last but most definitely not least the Sea Folks.

Egwene comes next with her rebel Aes Sedai group. This part is pure about intrigues and double-crossings with nothing being done. Well, not exactly. The bad guys keep killing people in the group left and right, but these seemingly "good" Aes Sedai are too busy scheming to look for a killer. There were several good parts, but they were few and between.

The only plot movement worth noticing came at the very end of the book Egwene. The most interesting development happened to be in the White Tower, of all the places. It did not move the overall plot by much, but was quite satisfying nonetheless. The last thing which needs to be mentioned: Robert Jordan is one of the greatest world-builders in fantasy. It can be clearly seen from the episode where Perrin visited a town to buy supplies; this town gave me creeps.

The atmosphere, people and unexplained happenings were great. This was the best part of otherwise completely hopeless Perrin's subplot. This is without a doubt the slowest book of the series. I am happy to say that at least 3 of the subplots which were dragging during several books will be resolved in the next installment of the series. View all 25 comments. Sep 23, Eric Allen rated it did not like it. It is, by far, and despite its flaws, my absolute favorite series of books.

Oh, there's plenty of people out there who can point out why this series is awful and has been dragged on far too long. But you know what, I don't care. To me, this series is great. I thought it could do no wrong. And then Crossroads of Twilight came out. This is the series that really got me into reading back when I was eleven years old. I've been reading it for so long, and I've read it through so many times, that the characters are more like old friends than characters in a book.

The places feel almost real to me, and I can see them in my mind as I read the series. I love the Wheel of Time For you to understand why I hate this book so much, I'm going to have to explain a few things to put my hatred in context for you. I picked up the first book in the series--The Eye of the World--at the library from the New Releases shelf because it had an awesome picture on the cover over twenty years ago.

I was hooked from page one. I have bought each and every one of these books multiple times. First in paperback because that was all I could afford, then when they wore out, I bought more copies of them. I bought them all in hardback for my spiffy bookshelf once I got older and could afford such things. I've bought the audio version to listen to at work, first in CD format, and then in digital.

I've spent quite a bit of money on these books throughout the years. I've been an avid fan from the very beginning. No matter what happened, no matter how many books the series dragged on into, I always came back for more, because I just couldn't stop. This series had become a part of my life. When the internet got big, I'd spend hours at a time reading theories on what was going to happen in the next book, or coming up with my own.

I put up with the series slowing down. Important things were still happening. I put up with all of the politics, and the boredom, and the stupidity of characters that I disliked. I put up with the stagnating storyline, and the apparent lack of forward progress. I put up with it all, because at the heart, these were still books about my very favorite characters in all of fiction, and I would always come back for more, no matter how dull it got.

I'd been promised an epic conclusion somewhere down the line, and I was eager to see it. But you know what, like many a great man before me has said, it's not the destination that's important, but the journey. And though that journey stretched far longer than I would have preferred at times, it was one that I have and still thoroughly enjoy.

I cannot count how many times I have read these books. Some of the early ones probably upwards of thirty to fifty times. Until this point in the series, there was always something happening. Someone was always doing something to move along to the next stage, even if it was just moving from one place to another in preparation for a later event in another book.

The books still ended with huge, epic climactic confrontations and a sense of something having been accomplished. They still ended with something having been done, and moved forward. So, not only did I have to wait the two and a half years since the previous book was released, I also had to wait several more months after its release to even pick up a copy to read.

Those were hard months full of temptation for me. Knowing that there was a Wheel of Time book out there that I had not yet read, and could, if I wanted to, if only I would just break the rules and go pick up a copy of it.

I picked up a copy of it in the airport on the way home, and read it at my first convenience, only to find that this book was a complete and utter BETRAYAL of all of my years of faithfully following this series through the good and the bad alike. Every book before this one, I could say, yeah, it seems like it's been stretched out unnecessarily, but things are still happening. Until this book.

This is the book where Robert Jordan stopped telling a story and started milking his fame. This is the book where Robert Jordan sold out. There wasn't anything in this book that I could use to justify its very existence with. This was a book that existed for the SOLE purpose of getting another thirty bucks out of me. It did not move the story or the characters at all, and it didn't even give me a mediocre climax at the end. Instead, it ends with a very weak cliffhanger that doesn't even really lead into the next book, because the character it happens to has a single chapter in the next book.

At less than half the length of the longest book in the series, Crossroads of Twilight is actually quite short. It's long for a mainstream novel, but by the standards of the Fantasy Genre, and this series in particular, this book is tiny. My first thought upon picking up a copy was that it took the writer over two years to give us the shortest book in the series? How does that work? Years later I realized that the author was suffering from the illness that later took his life, and I am sorry for being an annoying little snot over the wait, but you know what, I'm not THAT sorry.

Because this book really isn't much of a book at all. This is the shortest book in the series, but it feels like the longest. And as I've said before, a good story can be told in a single page if that's all it needs to get its message across. A good story doesn't need hundreds of pages of filler to make it better. Instead, the entire thing is filler. Filler that can be skipped while missing little to nothing that the next book doesn't explain.

This book is Robert Jordan taking three storylines that should have ended in the previous book, and stretching them out needlessly and pointlessly into an utterly superfluous novel that, honestly, can be skipped. You can get everything you need to know about the events in this book from the Wiki plot summary, and that's less than a page long. We begin with Perrin, dealing with the pressures of leading five separate armies that are supposed to be one, but refuse to see themselves as such.

This is actually a really good beginning to the book. I really enjoy seeing how Perrin deals with rumors of infidelity, people trying to make him into something that he doesn't think he is, and holding the various factions of his army together through sheer strength of will. This is an excellent beginning to the book. It shows his plight, and it shows how he will have to grow in order to overcome it.

Internal struggle is something that Robert Jordan does very well. Yes, that's right, an entire third of the book passes without a single thing worthy of mention occurring. I've said it before, and I'll say it again. This entire storyline of Elayne getting her throne should have been glossed over rather than stretched to fill up large sections of four entire books.

Because it paints a character they like as a petty, childish idiot, and because it's really not important to the overall story at all. What little intelligence Elayne has displayed up to this point, and really she hasn't shown much, just goes straight out the window in this storyline and she basically becomes dumb as a post. It stretches on to agonizing lengths and it really doesn't need to in order to get the point across.

And you know what, that she DOES get it, isn't really all that important either. I don't like her character because she's really not a character, among other reasons that I've already gone into in previous reviews of other books in this series. She's an heir to the throne. Take that away and she's absolutely nothing. She has no identity or personality as a character other than that. Her losing her only source of identity, as she should have by any and all rights after everything that's happened, and dealing with it would have been far more interesting than this load of crap.

Oh, and another thing that annoys me about her is how every other word out of her is whining about it being Rand's fault she's pregnant. Uh, no, it isn't. That's, frankly, just plain irresponsible and childish. I'm sorry if my saying so offends any ladies out there, but it is. I'm sorry that pregnancy sucks, but, I mean, come on, she's the one that tripped him into her bed. By his own logic, which he used to explain important characters being left out of earlier volumes, this makes absolutely no sense at all.

This is something that is not interesting at all, something that even fans of Elayne don't want to read about, and does little but take up massive amounts of space in a series that really doesn't need any extra filler to little point or purpose. I don't get it WHY is so much of the latter third of this series filled with a storyline that is almost completely pointless and serves little purpose to the overall plot of the series?

I'll tell you why. Because in this book, Robert Jordan sold out. He stopped telling a story, and he started stretching so he could get at least one extra novel out of the story and milk his fans for another thirty bucks each with this piece of crap. After that mind-numbing complete waste of three hundred pages, we shift to Egwene dealing with Aes Sedai politics.

If you enjoy Egwene, and the way she has to keep on her toes to hold the rebel Aes Sedai together, and keep them aimed at their goal, you may enjoy this section of the book. Me, I felt it was unnecessary. We already know what she's dealing with as Amyrlin Seat.

We don't need a reiteration of things that have already been established, especially when, like with Elayne's section, very little of overall importance takes place during this section. This is basically just copy and paste from any chapter of your choice about Egwene from the previous four books.

There are no new revelations given, and nothing happens to advance the plot. There is some foreshadowing given for the end of the book, but at this point, I don't think many people really cared. That event was not really important enough to deserve the foreshadowing in my opinion.

We shift back to Perrin in one of the most haunting and tone rich chapters of the entire series where he goes to buy grain in a haunted city. Robert Jordan has always been excellent in giving a good mood and tone for any given scene, and making you, as the reader, FEEL what's going on. Here he's outdone himself. This is probably one of my favorite chapters in the entire series.

Ironic, that. Jordan paints a picture of a dark and downtrodden city living in fear of their own dead and it's really spectacularly done. And then we get people around Rand doing nothing, and Rand making plans that really should have been left for the next book for all that's accomplished here in including it. Rand just cleansed freaking Sai'din.

Something no one has been able to do for three thousand years. He's put an end to male channelers going mad simply for being what they are. This is probably the most momentous thing that has happened in the entire series thus far, and he doesn't even bother to acknowledge that it even happened. We don't get any of his thoughts or feelings on the matter at all.

The entire event is treated as though it's of no import at all, and Rand, as a character has not grown in the slightest over it. Or at least he appears not to have. Most of this section is not even told from his point of view, and he's more of a side attraction to the things other people are doing.

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Essay writing topics ielts The Gathering Storm There are also new protagonists, and why not. He was a history buff and enjoyed hunting, fishing, sailing, poker, chess, pool, and pipe collecting. Gathering Darkness. Years later I realized that the author was suffering from the illness that later took his life, and I am sorry for being an annoying little snot over the wait, but you know what, I'm not THAT sorry.
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How to write a regignation I may be wrong, but I believe she was looking at dresses However in my eyes the flaws humanise these novels and serve to remove that element of pomposity I sense in other fantasy epics. So we spend five times as long on a less exciting version of events. About Robert Jordan. Nice review. Not to say it was bad! Aes Sedai are bonding Asha'men all over the place.
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Crossroads of Twilight, Wheel of Time Book 10, By Robert Jordan

She learns that Elaida has Zaidagiving her a square mile of Andor in return for fourteen Windfinders to them and that the Reds supplied while the siege goes. Alviarin is told she is Talene. He stops the futile torture. Media essays examples visits Pevara and, after of a captured Shaido and instead chops off his hand, then threatens to do the same to his other limbs and leave him behind to willing to do it order to get him to. Rolan takes a liking to. She decides to start with. He learns from Tarna that. He struggles with Egeanin for she will not try and. Elayne Travels to several locations share his views. Time to Be Gone.

In terms of plot development, this book has nothing to offer. Absolutely nothing. But the world and the characters are so fantastic I don't even mind. And since. The dead walk, armies march, and Egwene must take action or lose the White Tower. Summary of Crossroads of Twilight. Novel written by. Robert Jordan. Book. Crossroads of Twilight (abbreviated as CoT by fans) is the tenth book of The Wheel of Time series. It was published by Tor Books and.